Brand New Justicia Campus Brings the South African Schools Festival to Rural-est South Africa

We are thrilled to announce that less than one-month after the launch of our Justicia Digital Learning Campus (JDLC), we have partnered with the Grahamstown Foundation to host the South African Schools Festival of Arts and Creativity (the Mpumalanga edition) at the campus.

Aimed at Grade 11’s and 12’s, the programme helps us, as a rural-based nonprofit organisation, to extend an arts curriculum into some of our country’s most remote places. And so it was that on Friday 22nd April that we brought students from Madlala, Hlomani and Mabarule high schools to JDLC.

Performance, drama, poetry and dance – these are the activities that are often relegated in an environment where every spare minute is dedicated to passing students in the core subject areas. The festival develops a love for the Arts and encourages students to explore their own personal growth through art.

“It brings tears to my eyes to see these kids put every pain and obstacle on pause and create art that makes them look all so different to the person you know and teach every day. This kind of event is a privilege for these kids, as art is no priority in rural villages, and at most times a talented child has no support to further develop their abilities,” said Coordinator of Justicia Campus, Linky Nkuna.

As part of the day, dance group from nonprofit organisation, Moving Into Dance Mophatong (MIDM), introduced a fun, interactive and active way for students to learn their school subjects like maths, languages, science and biology. Edudance involves dance, music, as well as role play.

“Move your arms like a free bird does, pat your feet on the ground as though the sand were caressing your feet and feel the breeze whispering the sounds of African harmonies,” said Tholakele from MIDM when introducing the students from the three schools to edudance. www.midance.co.za

The students from the three different schools were emerged into one group that explored the art of dance, music and performing for the very first time, and they loved it.

The students from the three different schools were emerged into one group that explored the art of dance, music and performing for the very first time, and they loved it.

“Move your arms like a free bird does, pat your feet on the ground as though the sand were caressing your feet and feel the breeze whispering the sounds of African harmonies,” said Tholakele from MIDM when introducing the students from the three schools to edudance. “Allow creativity to flow through your body and allow it to absorb all the learning that is presented.”

“Move your arms like a free bird does, pat your feet on the ground as though the sand were caressing your feet and feel the breeze whispering the sounds of African harmonies,” said Tholakele from MIDM when introducing the students from the three schools to edudance. “Allow creativity to flow through your body and allow it to absorb all the learning that is presented”, she said.

As much as the day was meant for grade 11 and 12'S, the JDLC facilitators were so mesmerized and found themselves participating.

As much as the day was meant for grade 11 and 12′S, the JDLC facilitators were so mesmerized and found themselves participating.

Aimed at Grade 11’s and 12’s, the programme helps us, as a rural-based nonprofit organisation, to extend an arts curriculum into some of our country’s most remote places. And so it was that on Friday 22nd April that we brought students from Madlala, Hlomani and Mabarule high schools to JDLC.

Aimed at Grade 11’s and 12’s, the programme helps us, as a rural-based nonprofit organisation, to extend an arts curriculum into some of our country’s most remote places. And so it was that on Friday 22nd April that we brought students from Madlala, Hlomani and Mabarule high schools to JDLC.

The JDLC Coordinator Linky Nkuna was thrilled to finally get the Mpumalanga arts festivals to one of the most rural village in Mpumalanga to benefit the young talentyed students who yearn for the exposure to the arts of dancing and performance.

The JDLC Coordinator Linky Nkuna was thrilled to finally get the Mpumalanga Arts Festivals to one of the most rural villages in Mpumalanga, to benefit the young talented students who yearn for the exposure to the arts of dancing and performance, which are not priority in rural schools that are under-resourced.

Written by GWF Media Academy

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