Guest Post: Former Teacher Visits Justicia Campus and Says GWF is Leading the Charge

I just returned from my third visit to Londolozi. People often ask me why I trek back 9000 miles to the same place. And when they do, my face lights up, and I describe the very intentional harmony at Londolozi: the people with each other, with the animals and with the land, and the vision Londolozi has for recreating that harmony all over Africa and the world.

On this last trip I was lucky enough to experience the recreation of that harmony firsthand. Londolozi partners with the Good Work Foundation (GWF) whose mission is to bring a sustainable digitally empowered education model for rural Africa.

What does that look like?

In rural Africa, many people come from deep poverty that has existed over generations; many do not have electricity or running water, and education as it stands today, is not providing basic digital literacy or any of the necessary skills for competitiveness in the 21st century.

For example, in the community I visited, for those lucky enough to attend school the classrooms have on average 1 teacher for 75-80 students in a space that looks like it should hold about 25 people at most. Hardly anyone has ever gone on to university as most do not finish high school.

GWF is delivering “digital-era” literacy education and career training via community-driven digital learning centres of excellence.  The centers are digitally-powered and “online”, allowing rural communities access to world-class education and cutting-edge technology. So, surrounding school children of all ages attend the learning centres where they learn computer skills, hone their English (universal language) and work with a facilitator who enables them to imagine a future where they can support themselves, their families, and end the cycle of poverty.

Maybe that is by learning a trade, or better farming, or making clothes, or running their own small business, or yes – going on to university. In fact, since GWF began the learning centres, more than 70 young people have gone to university; before GWF, almost no one had ever gone.

As a former teacher – and coming from a long lineage of teachers – my heart burst open seeing the centre full of grade four children huddled together around computers and tablets, working together on language and math. They are full of hope, and enthusiasm, and dreams that simply were not possible before.

It’s a new day – and GWF is leading the charge to make this the norm rather than the exception. And it is working.

In a huge, tangible, scalable way.

As Mandela said: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” And GWF is doing just that.

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It’s a new day – and GWF is leading the charge to make this the norm rather than the exception. And it is working.

Jess Boon, Linky Nkuna and Susan Strauss

On this last trip I was lucky enough to experience the recreation of that harmony firsthand. Londolozi partners with the Good Work Foundation (GWF) whose mission is to bring a sustainable digitally empowered education model for rural Africa. Left to right: Jess Boon, Linky Nkuna and Susan Strauss.

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As Mandela said: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” And GWF is doing just that.

Written by Susan Strauss.

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