Our Top 3 Blog Posts on Education

Here are three of our most popular blogs so far this year. While the basis of what we do at Good Work Foundation is digital literacy, all of the blogs below focus on something far deeper, from the importance of “wonder” in a child’s education, to the profound life lesson that can be taught by South Africa’s buffalo thorn tree (this is a “goodie”). Go ahead and comment on your favourite blog – and spread our message by sharing the story you find most inspiring.

 1. Algebra on the Serengeti

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Kate, Bronwyn and Boyd practicing algebra in East Africa in 1994.

In her previous life, Kate Groch, our CEO, was a private tutor. Not just any kind of private tutor. Kate taught Maths on the Serengeti. A history lesson involved an interview with a real-life Masai warrior, and geography involved getting on a train and touring India. Kate’s experiences taught her to see the word “classroom” in a way that was ahead of its time. Read more.

2. Five Minutes with Byron Ross

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Byron Ross gets straight into “digital literacy” at Hazyview Digital Learning Centre.

Sometimes life presents itself with a fork in the road, and a level of courage is required if your choice is not strictly “conventional”. In January, our new Operations Manager for Mpumalanga, Byron Ross, spoke about crossing paths, buffalo thorns, changing the world and taking a leap of faith. Read more.

3. Student of the Week: Zachariah Mkhonto

Zachariah in the Madlala Open Learning Academy.

Zachariah in the Madlala Open Learning Academy.

What an amazing response we had from readers on the story of Zachariah, a 54-year old student learning “digital” and “English” at Madlala Digital Learning Centre’s Open Learning Academy. We asked our community on the blog and across social media to send Zachariah words of encouragement. Anne Bodnar said: “From New York City: Go Zachariah – so impressed and proud of you. Stay with it – you will never regret it.” Read more.

Thank you to our readers from across the world who support our blog every day. Thanks to you, our stories are transported beyond our rural spaces in South Africa, and are told everywhere from Australia and the far East, to Hawaii and beyond.

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