Rural teachers in South Africa: now uploading data to the cloud

Many years ago, computer literacy was not part of the teaching syllabus in South Africa, and in most cases in rural South Africa, this is still the norm. Today things are changing and our team at Good Work Foundation (GWF) and the Hazyview Digital Learning Campus are supporting rural teachers from Hazyview and surrounds in digital literacy.

“Our campus has been providing digital learning to children from local primary schools for almost two years now,” said Crispen Bvumbghe, Head of the Open Learning Academy. “Many of their teachers approached me and asked ‘what about us?’ That was a good question – one that we could not ignore.”

20 teachers from various primary schools (many of which are already partaking in the Open Learning Academy) are enrolled for our International Computer Driving License (ICDL).

“It is every teacher’s responsibility to remain current and relevant in information technology, because that is what will help us conduct valuable and meaningful lessons in class,” says Catherine Khoza, from Ifalethu Primary School.

With their full teaching schedules of six hours of teaching per day to classes of 60- 80 children at a time, these remarkable teachers still make it their mission to find two hours of computer lessons per day from Monday to Friday.

“These days everything is about technology. When the department of education emphasised that all the employees should have these skills, I struggled to understand the relevance until I had to help my class with English on a computer during Open Learning and I did not have a clue of what to do on a computer,” says Winnie Sambo, from Siyamukela Primary School.

Winnie had to start with the most basics on computers: “I remember trying to get a cursor to move to a file so I could open it. I told myself that I would sit there until dark if I have to until it moves. I also didn’t understand why I had to move it with my right hand because I was left-handed. I am so grateful for the ICDL facilitators who were very patient with us and took us through each and every step so we walk out of a class confident.”

Both Catherine and Winnie have now graduated. Have a look at their photos below. These rural teachers are all about staying up-to-date and moving as fast as the kids that they teach. No longer will their student’s results be stored on paper and in files. Oh no, today their results are uploaded to the cloud!

The Open Learning Academy is a Rand Water Foundation sponsored project.

Catherine Khoza from Tfolinhlahla Primary School and Paris Moeng, an ICT facilitator at GWF were capping the graduates at a a recent HDLC graduation ceremony.

Catherine Khoza, a teacher from Ifalethu Primary School and Paris Moeng, an ICT facilitator at GWF were capping the graduates at a a recent HDLC graduation ceremony. Catherine was also graduating herself.

“I remember trying to get a cursor to move to a file so I could open it. I told myself that I would sit there until dark if I have to until it moves," says Winnie Sambo, a teacher from Ifalethu Primary School.

“I remember trying to get a cursor to move to a file so I could open it. I told myself that I would sit there until dark if I have to until it moves,” says Winnie Sambo, a teacher from Siyamukela Primary School.

Both Catherine and Winnie have now graduated. Have a look at their photos below. These rural teachers are all about staying up-to-date and moving as fast as the kids.

Both Catherine and Winnie have now graduated. Have a look at their photos below. These rural teachers are all about staying up-to-date and moving as fast as the kids.

 

Written by Mpho Lebyane.

Comments